In the Passu village, Hunza valley, Pakistan, do people still live 100 years?

In the Passu village, Hunza valley, Pakistan, do people still live 100 years?

adventure travel & photography

Destinations: Pakistan ◦◦ India ◦◦Turkey ◦◦ Egypt ◦◦ Bulgaria ◦◦ Mongolia ◦◦ Bangladesh ◦◦ Jordan ◦◦ Russia ◦◦ Turkmenistan ◦◦ Iran ◦◦ Kazakhstan ◦◦ Japan ◦◦ Hong Kong ◦◦ Greece ◦◦ Ukraine ◦◦ Syria ◦◦ Morocco

Type: Photo stories ◦◦ Places ◦◦ Documentary ◦◦ Black and White ◦◦ Fine Art Prints ◦◦ Seascapes ◦◦ Urban

The story

"Unfortunately, no," says the old retired teacher who invited us to his home in the village of Passu in the Hunza Valley in Pakistan for a cup of tea and apples. "This was a phenomenon from the past, mainly because people produced their food and everything they owned with their own hands," the old man continues.

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Passu village is one of the most spectacular places in the Upper Hunza, surrounded by breathtaking landscapes and views of the 7,478 m high Passu Sar mountain, Passu glacier and Passu cones.

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The village of Passu itself is a small, picturesque, typical village in the Hunza Valley. We strolled through the narrow streets lined with low stone fences. Tiny houses, meadows, plots planted with various plants and especially many apple trees, which were in full bloom at this time of year The rugged mountain landscape, clean air and water, the abundance of healthy organic foods such as dried apricots and almonds, and relative remoteness have blessed the locals with excellent health and longevity.

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All the village's children go to school. The people are fair-skinned; some have blue eyes and European-looking facial features. We learned from the people of Passu village that the key to a healthy and long life is outdoor work, clean food and friendly relationships with other community members. It seems like an impossibly perfect life.

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The Cathedral Range, also known as the "Passu Cones," is one of the most prominent landmarks on the Karakoram Highway. The locals call this magnificent mountain Tupopdan or the Passu Cathedral because its shape rises to about 6000 metres. Tupopdan is sometimes translated as "hot rocks" because snow and ice seem to slide off (or melt away) from the cliff faces.

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We were approached on the street by a local teacher who, after a brief conversation, invited us to his home. We accepted and agreed to meet him a little later at the village's only shop. After about an hour, the man was indeed waiting for us there. The house was poor, with a fireplace in the middle where he lit a fire to brew herbal tea. His wife also showed up, bringing apples from last year's harvest. The two are teachers, humble people with five children, of whom he spoke with particular tenderness and pride.

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Hunza, including the village of Passu, has always been strikingly different from the rest of Pakistan. The origin of the people of the Hunza Valley has been long time disputed and still needs to be fully clarified. It is a long story, which I cannot cover here.

On the famous longevity in the valley, our host commented that this was a phenomenon from the past. People produced their food and everything they owned with their own hands. Nothing was imported from outside. Yes, drinking glacier water and eating large quantities of apricots contributed, but it was not the main reason for that phenomenon. Today, it is impossible to live this lifestyle, which, unfortunately, is also true for the people of the Hunza Valley.

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